Exhibit Designs
       
     
Vacant Lots
       
     
 For the Architectural League of New York's Vacant Lots, a study on infill housing for what were then (1986) poor and unattended neighborhoods, we used the vernacular technology of the metal stud in the form of  urban building blocks. The work was displayed on the surface; the background information was displayed in the internal block passages lined with gypsum board. Visitors could see the magnificent space of the Mercantile Exchange Building and each other through the screens of studs as they circulated through the urban grid. 
       
     
Bridging the Gap
       
     
 For this study in the pedestrian connection of the Brooklyn Bridge to Lower Manhattan, we developed a stanchion system of steel L-sections, bolts and guy wires with the feel of the light and small redundant members of the historical bridge.  The installation turned the space outside of the auditorium space of the Graduate School of Architecture and Planning , Columbia University into an informal gallery. The stanchion system was  flexible and useful enough that it remained in place for almost ten years after the show and displayed any number of exhibits.
       
     
Bridging3-1.jpg
       
     
Housing the Spectacle
       
     
 For an exhibit about large span structures and the scale of event they housed we used the emerging technology of the moment, cnc milling, to create back lit displays  with  miniaturized feel of spectacle. The triangular stanchions can be arranged to create a connections across a large space, in these images a gallery at Pratt Institute.
       
     
Interim Housing Rebuilds a Neighborhood
       
     
 For this exhibit of  post-disaster, modular interim housing units, we used moving boxes in a zig-zag formation connected  as a comment on the temporary nature of the housing and also as a solution to the budget and time constraints of the exhibit, which was installed in the lobby of The New York City Office of Emergency Management.
       
     
Exhibit Designs
       
     
Exhibit Designs

In approaching exhibit design we see out a system that enhances the appearance and the meaning of the work displayed and engages the architectural setting in the display.

Vacant Lots
       
     
Vacant Lots

with  Armand Le Gardeur, Graphics by Tibor Kalman 

 For the Architectural League of New York's Vacant Lots, a study on infill housing for what were then (1986) poor and unattended neighborhoods, we used the vernacular technology of the metal stud in the form of  urban building blocks. The work was displayed on the surface; the background information was displayed in the internal block passages lined with gypsum board. Visitors could see the magnificent space of the Mercantile Exchange Building and each other through the screens of studs as they circulated through the urban grid. 
       
     

For the Architectural League of New York's Vacant Lots, a study on infill housing for what were then (1986) poor and unattended neighborhoods, we used the vernacular technology of the metal stud in the form of  urban building blocks. The work was displayed on the surface; the background information was displayed in the internal block passages lined with gypsum board. Visitors could see the magnificent space of the Mercantile Exchange Building and each other through the screens of studs as they circulated through the urban grid. 

Bridging the Gap
       
     
Bridging the Gap

with Anthony Webster, Structural Engineer

 For this study in the pedestrian connection of the Brooklyn Bridge to Lower Manhattan, we developed a stanchion system of steel L-sections, bolts and guy wires with the feel of the light and small redundant members of the historical bridge.  The installation turned the space outside of the auditorium space of the Graduate School of Architecture and Planning , Columbia University into an informal gallery. The stanchion system was  flexible and useful enough that it remained in place for almost ten years after the show and displayed any number of exhibits.
       
     

For this study in the pedestrian connection of the Brooklyn Bridge to Lower Manhattan, we developed a stanchion system of steel L-sections, bolts and guy wires with the feel of the light and small redundant members of the historical bridge.  The installation turned the space outside of the auditorium space of the Graduate School of Architecture and Planning , Columbia University into an informal gallery. The stanchion system was  flexible and useful enough that it remained in place for almost ten years after the show and displayed any number of exhibits.

Bridging3-1.jpg
       
     
Housing the Spectacle
       
     
Housing the Spectacle

with Anthony Webster

 For an exhibit about large span structures and the scale of event they housed we used the emerging technology of the moment, cnc milling, to create back lit displays  with  miniaturized feel of spectacle. The triangular stanchions can be arranged to create a connections across a large space, in these images a gallery at Pratt Institute.
       
     

For an exhibit about large span structures and the scale of event they housed we used the emerging technology of the moment, cnc milling, to create back lit displays  with  miniaturized feel of spectacle. The triangular stanchions can be arranged to create a connections across a large space, in these images a gallery at Pratt Institute.

Interim Housing Rebuilds a Neighborhood
       
     
Interim Housing Rebuilds a Neighborhood
 For this exhibit of  post-disaster, modular interim housing units, we used moving boxes in a zig-zag formation connected  as a comment on the temporary nature of the housing and also as a solution to the budget and time constraints of the exhibit, which was installed in the lobby of The New York City Office of Emergency Management.
       
     

For this exhibit of  post-disaster, modular interim housing units, we used moving boxes in a zig-zag formation connected  as a comment on the temporary nature of the housing and also as a solution to the budget and time constraints of the exhibit, which was installed in the lobby of The New York City Office of Emergency Management.